Reader: Oxford Brookes Computer Science £46,509 rising annually to £52,346

Reader: Oxford Brookes Computer Science £46,509 rising annually to £52,346

Posted by Rebecca Martin on Thu, 29/10/2009 - 01:00

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AAF163/reader-in-computer-science/

The School of Technology wishes to strengthen its research base with the appointment of two Readers, one in an area of computer science and the other in an area of engineering. We are looking for individuals who will take a leading role in the development of research and knowledge transfer, including management of PhD students and research groups where appropriate.

The Computer Vision group in the Department of Computing was formed in 2005 by Philip Torr and William Clocksin, and is led by Philip Torr. It comprises 8 PhD's (with vacancies for two more if you know any bright applicants) and 4 post docs, in addition we have some semi regular visitors and joint grants with other universities that account for another 3 PhD's and 2 postdocs.

The aim of the group is to engage in state of the art research into the mathematical theory of computer vision and artificial intelligence, but to keep the mathematical research relevant to the needs of society. Our research is focused on Bayesian methods, in particular the study of the mathematics underlying Markov Random Fields, combinatorial optimization and Bayesian nets.

The applications come in many forms, and we are involved with several major companies and organizations. With Sony we are working on human computer interaction (via a camera, the "EyeToy") for the Play Stations 2 and 3, with Sharp we are working on generation of content for 3D displays, with Oxford Metrics Group we are working on computer understanding of films (e.g. what is the shape of objects in the scene etc) in order to make better special effects, we also work on motion capture of humans (and animals) in order to drive computer generated avatars. We work on medical image analysis and on surveillence. We also do collaborative work with Microsoft Research, London, Cambridge and Oxford Universities.